F/F/Fs Who Served in North Carolina Units

Any F/F/Fs that were called out in the Newsletter have now been noted within the various individual state pages with links to the particular Newsletter pages in which they were mentioned.  Whenever possible I have also linked the official history of that individual’s Unit was well. 

   Note:  This symbol (the symbol for “transformation” I understand … which also looks a bit like the WWII USAF symbol) will be used to indicated anyone who died as a consequence of the war.

Interesting statistics …. if true:

On this page http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=califia1&id=I1660   the genealogist Bill Boggess gave the following information regarding the Civil War:

“There were 50 [fifty] Floras who volunteered in the of 1.05 million CSA [Confederate States Army] members and 117 [one hundred and seventeen] Floras of the 2.21 million USA [United States Army] members.”  I haven’t seen this mentioned before but I find it interesting (if true) as I have not run across any Floras in my lines who served as part of the armed forces of the Confederacy in the 1861-1865 conflict.

Anyone with information to add to any of the F/F/Fs noted, please contact me and I will add it to the individual’s paragraphs in the appropriate state.  (Email me at:    floras@netspeed.com.au   for passing along such things as photos, additional information, etc.)

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Floore, E.   Co. A, 14th Regiment, North Carolina
Infantry (Confederate) Private

Floore, E.  Pre-War Residence  Edgecomb, North Carolina.  At Surrender of Gen. Johnston’s Army in North Carolina at Goldsboro, North Carolina.  Surrendered and was Paroled on 9 May 1865.Source:   http://www.confederatevets.com    from   Muster rolls and lists of Confederates paroled in North Carolina from 1862 to 1865.  National Archives Microfilm, M1781, Roll 1.

14th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   14th Infantry Regiment, formerly the 4th Volunteers, completed its organization in June, 1861, at Garysburg, North Carolina. Its companies were raised in the counties of Halifax, Onslow, Anson, Cleveland, Wake, Cumberland, Northampton, Stanly, and Davidson. With more than 1,000 men, the regiment moved to Virginia where it was placed in the Department of the Norfolk. Later it was assigned to General Colston’s, G.B. Anderson’s, Ramseur’s, and Cox’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 14th participated in the various campaigns of the army from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, fought with Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and ended the war at Appomattox. It sustained 17 casualties at Williamsburg, 102 during the Seven Days’ Battles, 139 Maryland Campaign, 4 at Fredericksburg, and 142 at Chancellorsville. Of the 306 engaged at Gettysburg, twenty percent were disabled, and there was 1 killed and 4 wounded at Bristoe. It surrendered 7 officers and 107 men. The field officers were Colonels R. Tyler Bennett, Junius Daniel, and George S. Lovejoy, and Majors Edward Dixon, Paul F. Faison, and Joseph H. Lambeth.

  Flora, Elvin   Co. F, 4th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Floor, E.

4th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   4th Infantry Regiment State Troops completed its organization in May, 1862, at Camp Hill, near Garysburg, North Carolina. It recruited its members in Iredell, Rowan, Wayne, Beaufort, Wilson, and Davie counties. Ordered to Virginia, the unit served in General Featherston’s, G.B. Anderson’s, Ramseur’s, and Cox’s Brigade. It was active at Williamsburg, Seven Pines, and the Seven Days’ Battles, then shared in the campaigns of the army from South Mountain to Cold Harbor. Later the 4th was involved in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations and the Appomattox Campaign. It lost 77 killed, 241 wounded, and 6 missing of the 678 engaged at Seven Pines, sustained 58 casualties during the Maryland Campaign, and had 45 killed and 110 wounded at Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg the unit lost thirty-one percent of the 196 engaged, and 18 were disabled at Bristoe. The records show 8 officers and 101 men present on April 9, 1865. Its field officers were Colonels George B. Anderson, Bryan Grimes, Edwin A. Osborne, and James H. Wood; Lieutenant Colonels David M. Carter and John A. Young; and Majors Edward S. Marsh and Absalom K. Simonton.

  Flora, James   Co. A, 3rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate) Private

3rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   3rd Infantry Regiment State Troops completed its organization at Garysburg, North Carolina, in May, 1861. The men were from Wilmington and the counties of Green, Duplin, Cumberland, Onslow, Bladen, New Hanover, and Beaufort. During July part of the regiment moved to Richmond, Virginia, then was joined by the remaining companies some weeks later. After serving in the Department of Northern Virginia and the Department of North Carolina, it was attached to General Ripley’s, Colston’s, Steuart’s, and Cox’s Brigade. The 3rd fought on many battlefields of the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, marched with Early to the Shenandoah Valley, and saw action around Appomattox. It reported 46 casualties at Beaver Dam Creek, 80 at Malvern Hill, 253 at Sharpsburg, 3 at Fredericksburg, and 179 at Chancellorsville. The unit lost 4 killed and 10 wounded at Second Winchester, forty percent of the 548 engaged at Gettysburg, and 7 killed and 65 wounded during the Mine Run Campaign. It surrendered with 4 officers and 53 men in April, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William L. DeRosset, Gaston Meares, and Stephen D. Thruston; Lieutenant Colonels Robert H. Cowan, William M. Parsley, and Edward Savage; and Major William T. Ennett.

Flora, John   Co. H, 4th Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry (59th North Carolina State Troops) (Confederate) Private

Information regarding this John Flora from Donna O’Malley as follows:

“My John Flora enlisted in Co. H on 12/18/1862 in Nash County; wounded and caputured 6/19/1863 in Middleburg, VA; exchanged 6/30/1863 in City Point, VA; in August 1864 was reported as “absent in Wilson hospital sick”; 12/31/1864 in General Hospital No. 2, Wilson, NC   Source:  The 4th North CArolina Cavlary in the Civil War by Neil Hunter Raiford.”

4th Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry (59th North Carolina State Troops)   Overview:   See history for 59th Regiment, North Carolina State Troops.

Flora, John   Co. E, 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry (Confederate) Private

NOTE:  Two very similar entries here for a John Flora in a couple of North Carolina units, but nothing in the NPS database linking the three.

2nd Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

  Flora, John   Co. B, 2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate) Private

NOTE:  Two very similar entries here for a John Flora in a couple of North Carolina units, but nothing in the NPS database linking the three.

2nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   2nd Infantry Regiment State Troops was assembled at Garysburg, North Carolina, in May, 1861, with slightly more than 1,300 men. Its companies were recruited in the following counties: New Hanover, Wilson, Surry, Carteret, Duplin, Guilford, Sampson, Craven, Jones, and Pamlico. After serving in the Department of North Carolina the unit moved to Virginia where it was assigned to G.B. anderson’s, Ramseur’s, and Cox’s Brigade. It took an active part in the difficult campaigns of the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, fought with Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and ended the war at Appomattox. The regiment sustained 116 casualties during the Seven Days’ Battles, 50 at Sharpsburg, 21 at Fredericksburg, and 214 at Chancellorsville. Of the 243 engaged at Gettysburg, twenty-five percent were disabled, and there were 2 killed and 2 wounded at Bristoe. Only 6 officers and 48 men surrendered. The filed officers were Colonels William P. Bynum, John P. Cobb, William R. Cox, and Charles C. Tew; Lieutenant Colonel Walter S. Stallings; and Majors John Howard, Daniel W. Hurtt, and J.Turner Scales.

Flora, Larry   Co. G, 5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate) Private

5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   5th Infantry Regiment State Troops was organized at Halifax, North Carolina, in July,1861. Its companies were recruited in the counties of Cumberland, Gates, Johnston, Graven, Rowan, Bertie, Wilson, and Caswell. Ordered to Virginia, the regiment reached Manassas on July 19 and fought in the battle under General Longstreet. In April, 1862, it had 460 effectives and during the war was brigaded under Generals Early, Garland, Iverson, R. D. Johnston. It participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, then was involved in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox Campaign. It had 180 men in action at Seven Pines, lost 10 killed, 22 wounded, and 4 missing during the Seven Days’ Battles, and had 4 killed and 37 wounded at Chancellorsville. The unit took 473 men to Gettysburg, losing more than half, and reported 16 disabled at Bristoe and 3 at Mine Run. It surrendered with 7 officers and 76 men of which 48 were armed.

The field officers were Colonels Thomas M. Garrett and Duncan K. McRae; and Lieutenant Colonels John C. Badham, William J. Hill, Joseph P. Jones, John W. Lea, and Peter J. Sinclair.

Florey, James  Co. K, 66th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, James

66th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   66th Infantry Regiment was organized at Kinston, North Carolina, in October, 1862, by consolidating the 8th North Carolina Battalion Partisan Rangers and the 13th North Carolina Infantry Battalion. Its men were from the counties of Orange, Nash, Franklin, Wayne, Lenoir, Carteret, Jones, Duplin, and New Hanover. The unit was stationed at Wilmington, then in May, 1864, moved to Virginia. Attached to General J.G. Martin’s and Kirkland’s Brigade, it fought at Cold Harbor, was placed in the trenches of Petersburg, and saw action at Bentonville. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered with the Army of Tennessee. The field officers were Colonels Alexander D. Moore and John H. Nethercutt, Lieutenant Colonel Clement G. Wright, and Major David S. Davis.

Predecessor unit:    8th Battalion Partisan Rangers was formed during the spring of 1863 using Nethercutt’s Company of Partisan Rangers as its nucleus. The unit contained four companies and served in the New Bern-Kinston area of North Carolina until October when it merged into the 66th North Carolina Regiment. Its commander was Major John H. Nethercutt.

  Florey, James   Co. D, 13th Battalion, North Carolina Infantry (Confederate)  Private

13th Battalion, North Carolina Infantry   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

  Flory, Densen    Co. K, 36th Regiment United States Colored Volunteer Infantry (Union)   In as Private, Left as Corporal

36th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry     Overview:     Organized February 8, 1864, from 2nd North Carolina Colored Infantry. Attached to U. S. Forces, Norfolk and Portsmouth, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, to April, 1864. District of St. Marys, Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina to June, 1864. Unattached, Army of the James, to August, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 18th Corps, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 25th Corps, December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 25th Corps, and Dept. of Texas, to October, 1866.

Service:    -Duty at Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., till April, 1864. At Point Lookout, Md., District of St. Marys, guarding prisoners till July, 1864. Expedition from Point Lookout to Westmoreland County April 12-14. Expedition from Point Lookout to Rappahannock River May 11-14, and to Pope’s Creek June 11-21. Moved from Point Lookout to Bermuda Hundred, Va., July 1-3. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond, Va., July 3, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Battle of Chaffin’s Farm, New Market Heights, September 29-30. Battle of Fair Oaks October 27-28. Dutch Gap November 17. Indiantown, Sandy Creek, N. C., December 18 (Detachment). Duty north of James River before Richmond till March 27, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 27-April 9. Occupation of Richmond April 3. Duty in Dept. of Virginia till May. Moved to Texas May 24-June 6. Duty along the Rio Grande, Texas, and at various points in Texas till October, 1866. Mustered out October 28, 1866.Predecessor unit:      NORTH CAROLINA VOLUNTEERS.    2nd REGIMENT INFANTRY (AFRICAN DESCENT).     Organized at Portsmouth, Va., October 28, 1863. Attached to Wild’s African Brigade, U.S. Forces, Norfolk and Portsmouth, Dept. Virginia and North Carolina, to February, 1864. (A Detachment, with African Brigade, to Folly Island, S.C., 10th Army Corps, Dept. of the South, July 29-August 9, 1863, and in operations on Morris Island and Folly Island against Fort Sumpter and Charleston till December, 1863.) (A Detachment at New Berne, N.C., and participated in scout from Rocky Run toward Trenton, N.C., December 21-24, 1863.) Regiment on Expedition from Norfolk, Va., to South Mills, Camden, etc., N.C., December 5-24, 1863. Designation of Regiment changed to 36th United States Colored Troops February 8, 1864, which see.
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