F/F/Fs Who Served in Virginia Units

Any F/F/Fs that were called out in the Newsletter have now been noted within the various individual state pages with links to the particular Newsletter pages in which they were mentioned.  Whenever possible I have also linked the official history of that individual’s Unit was well. 

   Note:  This symbol (the symbol for “transformation” I understand … which also looks a bit like the WWII USAF symbol) will be used to indicated anyone who died as a consequence of the war.

Interesting statistics …. if true:

On this page http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=califia1&id=I1660   the genealogist Bill Boggess gave the following information regarding the Civil War:

“There were 50 [fifty] Floras who volunteered in the of 1.05 million CSA [Confederate States Army] members and 117 [one hundred and seventeen] Floras of the 2.21 million USA [United States Army] members.”  I haven’t seen this mentioned before but I find it interesting (if true) as I have not run across any Floras in my lines who served as part of the armed forces of the Confederacy in the 1861-1865 conflict.

Anyone with information to add to any of the F/F/Fs noted, please contact me and I will add it to the individual’s paragraphs in the appropriate state.  (Email me at:    floras@netspeed.com.au   for passing along such things as photos, additional information, etc.)

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  Fleury, (Unknown)   Co. A, 3rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry  (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Terry, George P.  (????)

3rd Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   3rd Cavalry Regiment was organized with independent companies and entered Confederate service on July 1, 1861. The regiment was formed with eleven companies, later reduced to ten. It was also called 2nd Regiment until October. Its members were raised in the counties of Mecklenburg, Elizabeth City, New Kent, Halifax, Nottoway, Cumberland, Dinwiddie, and Prince Edward. For a time six companies served in the Department of the Peninsula and four in the Valley District. Later the unit was assigned to General F. Lee’s, Wickham’s, and Munford’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It fought in many conflicts from Williamsburg to Fredericksburg, then was involved in the engagements at Kelly’s Ford, Chancellorsville, Brandy Station, Upperville, Gettysburg, Bristoe, Mine Run, The Wilderness, Todd’s Tavern, Spotsylvania, Haw’s Shop, and Cold Harbor. The 3rd went on to participate in Early’s operations in the Shenandoah Valley and the Appomattox Campaign. It took 210 effectives to Gettysburg, but only 3 surrendered on April 9, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels Thomas F. Goode, Robert Johnston, and Thomas H. Owen; Lieutenant Colonels William R. Carter, William M. Feild, and John T. Thornton; and Majors Henry Carrington and Jefferson C. Phillips.

  Fleury, Seth W.   Co. D, 41st Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flournoy, Seth W.

41st Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   41st Infantry Regiment completed its organization in July, 1861. Men of this unit were recruited in Petersburg and Sussex, Chesterfield, Norfolk, and Nansemond counties. After serving in the Department of Norfolk, it was assigned to General Mahone’s and Weisiger’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 41st fought with the army from Seven Pines to Cold Harbor, then was involved in the Petersburg siege south of the James River and the final campaign at Appomattox. It contained 564 effectives in June, 1862, lost 14 killed, 51 wounded, and 20 missing at Malvern Hill, and 8 killed and 34 wounded at Second Manassas. The unit reported 9 casualties in the Maryland Campaign, 5 at Fredericksburg, and 29 at Chancellorsville. Of the 276 engaged at Gettysburg, five percent were disabled. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 10 officers and 99 men. The field officers were Colonels John R. Chambliss, Jr. and William A. Parham, Lieutenant Colonels George Blow, Jr. and Joseph P. Minetree, and Majors William H. Etheredge and Francis W. Smith.

  Flora, Abraham   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

  Flora, Benjamin D.   Co. B, 49th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

49th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   49th Infantry Regiment completed its organization in July, 1861. Its members were from the counties of Prince William, Warren, Fauquier, Rappahannock, Amherst, and Shenandoah. Three companies fought at First Manassas and these companies formed the nucleus of the regiment. It was assigned to General Featherston’s, Early’s, W.Smith’s, Pegram’s, and J.A. Walker’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit participated in many battles from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, was active in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations, and took part in the final campaign at Appomattox. It reported 40 casualties at First Manassas and in April, 1862, contained 539 effectives. The regiment lost fifty-three percent of the 424 at Seven Pines, had 2 killed and 36 wounded during the Seven Days’ Battles, and suffered 5 killed and 73 wounded in the Maryland Campaign. At Fredericksburg 6 were killed and 46 wounded, at Gettysburg thirty-five percent of the 281 were disabled, and at The Wilderness and Spotsylvania 87 were lost. On April 9, 1865, it surrendered with 9 officers and 46 men. The field officers were Colonels John C. Gibson and William Smith, Lieutenant Colonels Charles B. Christian and Edward Murray, and Major Caleb Smith.

  Flora, B.F.   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:   Flora, Benjamin

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

  Flora, Daniel   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)  Private

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

  Flora, George W.   Co. B, 24th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

24th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   24th Infantry Regiment was assembled in June, 1861, with men from Floyd, Franklin, Carroll, Giles, Pulaski, Mercer, and Henry Counties. It served under Early at First Manassas, then was assigned to Early’s, Kemper’s, and W.R. Terry’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 24th participated in the campaigns of the army from Williamsburg to Gettysburg except when it was detached to Suffolk with Longstreet. Later it was involved in the engagements at Plymouth and Drewry’s Bluff, the Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox operations. The regiment contained 740 men in April, 1862, and reported 189 casualties at Williamsburg and 107 at Seven Pines. It lost 4 killed, 61 wounded, and 14 missing at Frayser’s Farm, had 8 wounded at Fredericksburg, and had about forty percent of the 395 engaged at Gettysburg disabled. Many were lost at Sayler’s Creek with no officers and 22 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Jubal A. Early and William A. Terry; Lieutenant Colonels Peter Hairston, Jr. and Richard L. Maury; and Majors William W. Bentley, Joseph A. Hambrick, and J.P. Hammet.

Flora, G.P.   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

  Flora, Henry C.   Co. B, 20th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery (Confederate) Private

20th Battalion, Virginia Heavy Artillery   Overview:   20th Heavy Artillery Battalion was organized and accepted into Confederate service at Drewry’s Bluff, Virginia, in June, 1862. It contained four companies and a fifth was added in September. The unit was attached to the Department of Richmond and aided in the defense of the city. Converted to infantry in 1865, it participated in the Appomattox Campaign and surrendered with 11 men. Majors Johnston DeLagnel and James E. Robertson were in command.

   Flora, Isaac   Co. A, 6th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

6th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   6th Infantry Regiment, organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, recruited its men at Norfolk and in the counties of Princess Anne, Nansemond, and Chesterfield. It served in the Department of Norfolk, then in June, 1862, was placed in Mahone’s Brigade with 673 effectives. Later it was under the command of General Weisiger. The 6th participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then saw action in the Petersburg trenches and around Appomattox. It reported 10 killed, 33 wounded, and 8 missing at Malvern Hill, had 12 killed and 49 wounded at Second Manassas, and had 5 killed and 34 wounded at Fredericksburg. The regiment sustained 47 casualties at Chancellorsville and lost three percent of the 288 engaged at Gettysburg. It surrendered 110 officers and men on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Thomas J. Corprew, William Mahone, and George T. Rogers; Lieutenant Colonels William T. Lundy and Henry W. Williamson; and Major Robert B. Taylor.

Flora, J.J.   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)  NFI

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

Flora, Joel   Co. A, 6th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate)  Private

6th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   6th Infantry Regiment, organized at Norfolk, Virginia, in May, 1861, recruited its men at Norfolk and in the counties of Princess Anne, Nansemond, and Chesterfield. It served in the Department of Norfolk, then in June, 1862, was placed in Mahone’s Brigade with 673 effectives. Later it was under the command of General Weisiger. The 6th participated in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then saw action in the Petersburg trenches and around Appomattox. It reported 10 killed, 33 wounded, and 8 missing at Malvern Hill, had 12 killed and 49 wounded at Second Manassas, and had 5 killed and 34 wounded at Fredericksburg. The regiment sustained 47 casualties at Chancellorsville and lost three percent of the 288 engaged at Gettysburg. It surrendered 110 officers and men on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels Thomas J. Corprew, William Mahone, and George T. Rogers; Lieutenant Colonels William T. Lundy and Henry W. Williamson; and Major Robert B. Taylor.

Flora, John   Co. F, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

Flora, John F.   Co. A, 14th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Burrough’s) (Confederate) Private and Co. F, 15th Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) and Co. G, 5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, John L.

14th Battalion, Virginia Cavalry (Burroughs’)   Overview:   14th Cavalry Battalion [also called Chesapeake Battalion] was organized in May, 1862, with four companies. It included three companies from the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry, Provisional Army. The unit served under General Daniel at Malvern Cliff, then was assigned to R. Ransom’s Brigade. In September it was consolidated with the 15th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Major Edgar Burroughs was in command.

15th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   15th Cavalry Regiment was formed in September, 1862, by consolidating the 14th and 15th Battalions Virginia Cavalry. The unit served in W.H.F. Lee’s, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was active in the Chancellorsville Campaign and later reported 2 killed and 14 wounded during the operations around Bristoe. The regiment continued the fight at Mine Run and The Wilderness, then saw action about Cold Harbor. It moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley and on November 8, 1864, was absorbed by the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. The field officers were Colonels William B. Ball and Charles R. Collins, Lieutenant Colonel John Critcher, and Major Edgar Burroughs.

5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   5th Cavalry Regiment was organized in June, 1862, using the 2nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. The men were from Petersburg and Fairfax, Gloucester, King and Queen, Mathews, Randolph, and James City counties. It was assigned to W.H.F. Lee’s, F. Lee’s, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit participated in the Seven Days’ Battles, the Second Manassas and Maryland campaigns, and the conflicts at Fredericksburg, Brandy Station, Upperville, Gettysburg, Bristoe, and Mine Run. Later it was involved at The Wilderness and Cold Harbor, and in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations. On November 8, 1864, it was consolidated with the 15th Virginia Cavalry Regiment and redesignated the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry Consolidated. This command took part in the defense of Petersburg and saw action around Appomattox. Only 150 men were engaged at Gettysburg and 2 surrendered at Appomattox as most cut through the Federal lines and disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Reuben B. Boston, H. Clay Pate, and Thomas L. Rosser; Lieutenant Colonel James H. Allen; and Majors Beverly B. Douglas, John Eells, Cyrus Harding, Jr., and John W. Puller.

Predecessor unit:
2nd Cavalry Battalion was formed in May, 1862, with six companies and appears to have been a command of scouts. A month later four companies were added and the unit became the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel H. Clay Pate was in command.

Flora, J.R.   Co. G, 5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, John L.

5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   5th Cavalry Regiment was organized in June, 1862, using the 2nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. The men were from Petersburg and Fairfax, Gloucester, King and Queen, Mathews, Randolph, and James City counties. It was assigned to W.H.F. Lee’s, F. Lee’s, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit participated in the Seven Days’ Battles, the Second Manassas and Maryland campaigns, and the conflicts at Fredericksburg, Brandy Station, Upperville, Gettysburg, Bristoe, and Mine Run. Later it was involved at The Wilderness and Cold Harbor, and in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations. On November 8, 1864, it was consolidated with the 15th Virginia Cavalry Regiment and redesignated the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry Consolidated. This command took part in the defense of Petersburg and saw action around Appomattox. Only 150 men were engaged at Gettysburg and 2 surrendered at Appomattox as most cut through the Federal lines and disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Reuben B. Boston, H. Clay Pate, and Thomas L. Rosser; Lieutenant Colonel James H. Allen; and Majors Beverly B. Douglas, John Eells, Cyrus Harding, Jr., and John W. Puller.

Predecessor unit:
2nd Cavalry Battalion was formed in May, 1862, with six companies and appears to have been a command of scouts. A month later four companies were added and the unit became the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel H. Clay Pate was in command.

Flora, Moses   Co. H, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, Moses T.

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

Flora, R.   Otey’s Company, Virginia Light Artillery, Local Defense(Confederate) Corporal

Otey’s Company, Virginia Light Artillery, Local Defense   Overview:   Otey Light Artillery was organized at Richmond, Virginia, in March, 1862. It became part of the 13th Battalion Virginia Artillery but for some time operated as an independent command. The unit served in western Virginia and, assigned to J.F. King’s Battalion, sustained 14 casualties during the Kanawha Valley operations. In December the battery contained 3 officers and 69 men and was attached to the Department of Western Virginia and East Tennessee. Later it participated in the Knoxville Campaign, then was ordered to join the Army of Northern Virginia. It was assigned to W.H. Gibbes’ Battalion, took part in the defense of Petersburg, and ended the war at Appomattox as infantry. The company was commanded by Captains G. Gaston Otey and David N. Walker.

Flora, Reuben   Co. A, 4th Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

4th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   4th Infantry Regiment was assembled at Winchester, Virginia, in July, 1861. Its companies were from the counties of Wythe, Montgomery, Pulaski, Smyth, Grayson, and Rockbridge. It became part of the Stonewall Brigade and served under Generals T.J. Jackson, T.B. Garnett, Winder, Paxton, J.A. Walker, and W. Terry. The regiment fought at First Manassas, First Kernstown, and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign. It then participated in many conflicts of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, was with Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and saw action around Appomattox. The unit reported 5 killed, 23 wounded, and 48 missing at First Kernstown, took 317 effectives to Port Republic, had 7 killed and 25 wounded at Malvern Hill, and had 19 killed and 78 wounded of the 180 at Second Manassas. It lost forty-eight percent of the 355 engaged at Chancellorsville and more than fifty percent of the 257 at Gettysburg. The regiment surrendered with 7 officers and 38 men of which only 17 were armed. Its field officers were Colonels James T. Preston, Charles A. Ronald, and William Terry; Lieutenant Colonels Robert D. Gardner and Lewis T. Moore; and Majors Matthew D. Bennett, Joseph F. Kent, and Albert G. Pendleton.

Flora, Samuel B.   Co. H, 53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private

53rd Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   53rd Infantry Regiment was organized in December, 1861, by consolidating Tomlin’s and Montague’s Battalions, and Waddill’s Infantry Company. Many of the men were recruited in Halifax, New Kent, Charles City, and Pittsylvania counties. It was assigned to General Armistead’s, Barton’s, and Steuart’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit was active from Seven Pines to Gettysburg, served in North Carolina, then fought at Drewry’s Bluff and Cold Harbor. Later it participated in the long Petersburg siege north of the James River and the Appomattox Campaign. This regiment contained 468 effectives in June, 1862, lost 31 of the 128 engaged at Malvern Hill, and reported 11 casualties during the Maryland Campaign. Of the 435 who saw action at Gettysburg more than thirty percent were disabled, and there were 3 killed, 33 wounded, and 3 missing at Drewry’s Bluff. Many were captured at Sayler’s Creek, and 6 officers and 74 men surrendered on April 9, 1865. The field officers were Colonels William R. Aylett, John Grammar, Jr., Carter L. Stevenson, and Harrison B. Tomlin; Lieutenant Colonels Rawley W. Martin, Edgar B. Montague, John C. Timberlake, and George M. Waddill; and Majors Henry Edmundson and William Leigh.

Flora, T.   Co. G, Fifth Regiment, Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) Private

5th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   5th Cavalry Regiment was organized in June, 1862, using the 2nd Battalion Virginia Cavalry as its nucleus. The men were from Petersburg and Fairfax, Gloucester, King and Queen, Mathews, Randolph, and James City counties. It was assigned to W.H.F. Lee’s, F. Lee’s, Lomax’s, and Payne’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The unit participated in the Seven Days’ Battles, the Second Manassas and Maryland campaigns, and the conflicts at Fredericksburg, Brandy Station, Upperville, Gettysburg, Bristoe, and Mine Run. Later it was involved at The Wilderness and Cold Harbor, and in Early’s Shenandoah Valley operations. On November 8, 1864, it was consolidated with the 15th Virginia Cavalry Regiment and redesignated the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry Consolidated. This command took part in the defense of Petersburg and saw action around Appomattox. Only 150 men were engaged at Gettysburg and 2 surrendered at Appomattox as most cut through the Federal lines and disbanded. The field officers were Colonels Reuben B. Boston, H. Clay Pate, and Thomas L. Rosser; Lieutenant Colonel James H. Allen; and Majors Beverly B. Douglas, John Eells, Cyrus Harding, Jr., and John W. Puller.

Predecessor unit:
2nd Cavalry Battalion was formed in May, 1862, with six companies and appears to have been a command of scouts. A month later four companies were added and the unit became the 5th Regiment Virginia Cavalry. Lieutenant Colonel H. Clay Pate was in command.

Florey, Joel   Co. D, 97th Regiment, Virginia Militia (Spitler’s)  (Confederate) Private

97th Regiment, Virginia Militia (Spitler’s)   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

   Flory, James   18th Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) Private

Brother to John M. Flory.  Killed in action September 22, 1864 at the Battle of Fisher’s Hill during the 1864 Shenandoah Valley Campaign.  (Thanks to Information from Chris who adds:  “[James was a son] of Jonathan (brother to my GGG Grandfather, Joel), son of John, son of Reverend John (Johannes) S. Flory, son of Abraham (brother of Joseph I of the C-line.) ”

Flory, John M.   Co. K, 13th Virginia Infantry (Confederate) Private / Co. C, 18th Virginia Cavalry (Confederate) Entered as Private, Left as Corporal

Alternate Names in USG Records:  Flora, John M.   and    Fleury, J.

John “was wounded at the Battle of Gaines Mill in 1862 and then captured at the Second Battle of Fredericksburg during the Chancellorsville campaign in May 1863.  Upon his release in late 1863, he joined the 18th VA Cavalry where his younger brother, James, was already serving as a Private. John would subsequently be promoted to Corporal but captured, yet, again, outside of Lynchburg in June 1864.” (Thanks to information provided by Chris for this who adds:  “[John was a son] of Jonathan (brother to my GGG Grandfather, Joel), son of John, son of Reverend John (Johannes) S. Flory, son of Abraham (brother of Joseph I of the C-line.) ”

13th Regiment, Virginia Infantry   Overview:   13th Infantry Regiment completed its organization during the summer of 1861 with men from Winchester and Culpeper, Orange, Louisa, and Hampshire counties. After fighting at First Manassas and in Jackson’s Valley Campaign, it served in General Early’s, W.Smith’s, Pegram’s, and J.A. Walker’s Brigade. The 13th was prominent in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, then it moved with Early to the Shenandoah Valley and later was involved in the Appomattox operations. It reported 16 casualties at Cross Keys and Port Republic, 111 at Gaines’ Mill, 34 at Cedar Mountain, 46 at Second Manassas, 22 at Fredericksburg, and 36 at Chancellorsville. During the Gettysburg Campaign it was left at Winchester as provost guard. The unit sustained heavy losses at Cedar Creek and surrendered with 10 officers and 52 men. Its commanders were Colonels George A. Goodman, Ambrose P. Hill, James B. Terrill, and James A. Walker; and Majors Charles T. Crittenden and John B. Sherrard.

18th Regiment, Virginia Cavalry   Overview:   18th Cavalry Regiment was organized in December, 1862. Most of its members had served in the 1st Regiment Virginia Partisan Rangers (subsequently the 62nd Regiment Virginia Infantry). The unit was assigned to Imboden’s and W.L. Jackson’s Brigade and after the participating in the Gettysburg Campaign, skirmished the Federals in western Virginia. Later it served in the Shenandoah Valley and disbaned during April, 1865. The field officers were Colonel George W. Imboden, Lieutenant Colonel David E. Beall, and Major Alex. Monroe.

H O M E