F/F/Fs Who Served in Alabama Units

Any F/F/Fs that were called out in the Newsletter have now been noted within the various individual state pages with links to the particular Newsletter pages in which they were mentioned.  Whenever possible I have also linked the official history of that individual’s Unit was well. 

   Note:  This symbol (the symbol for “transformation” I understand … which also looks a bit like the WWII USAF symbol) will be used to indicated anyone who died as a consequence of the war.

Interesting statistics …. if true:

On this page http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=califia1&id=I1660   the genealogist Bill Boggess gave the following information regarding the Civil War:

“There were 50 [fifty] Floras who volunteered in the of 1.05 million CSA [Confederate States Army] members and 117 [one hundred and seventeen] Floras of the 2.21 million USA [United States Army] members.”  I haven’t seen this mentioned before but I find it interesting (if true) as I have not run across any Floras in my lines who served as part of the armed forces of the Confederacy in the 1861-1865 conflict.

Anyone with information to add to any of the F/F/Fs noted, please contact me and I will add it to the individual’s paragraphs in the appropriate state.  (Email me at:    floras@netspeed.com.au   for passing along such things as photos, additional information, etc.)

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  Florey, H.E.   Co. I, 4th Regiment, Alabama Infantry (Confederate) Private

NOTE:  Three entries here all for “H.E. Florey” in various Alabama CSA Units.  I would have the inclination to definitely say they are all three the same fellow, but the NPS database does not related them one to the other.  So, will leave them as three separate.  It would seem, however, that H.E. was in the conflict from the beginning to the end …. probably invalided out from his first unit and then moved more into support roles.  S.

4th Regiment, Alabama Infantry   Overview:   4th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Dalton, Georgia, in May 1861. The men were recruited in Dallas, Madison, Macon, Lauderdale, Jackson, Marengo, Perry, and Conecuh counties.

Ordered to Virginia, the unit fought in the Battle of First Manassas, under General B. E. Bee. In this fight it lost thirty-three percent of the 750 engaged, including all its field officers. Later the 4th was assigned to General Law’s and W. F. Perry’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. It was active in the campaigns of the army from Seven Pines, to Cold Harbor except when it was detached with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville The regiment was placed in the trenches of Petersburg, and ended the war at Appomattox.
It reported 130 men disabled at Gaines’ Mill, 63 at Second Manassas, and 87 at Gettysburg. Other casualties sustained were thirty-three percent of the 300 at Chickamauga, and thirty percent of the 250 at The Wilderness.
This unit surrendered with 21 officers and 202 men. The field officers were Colonels P. D. Bowles, Egbert J. Jones, and Evander M. Law; Lieutenant Colonels Thomas J. Goldsby, O. K. McLemore, and L. H. Scruggs; and Majors Ben Allston, T. K. Coleman, W. Mack Robbins, and Charles L. Scott.

  Florey, H.E.   Co. C, 1st Regiment, Alabama Reserves (62nd Regiment Infantry) (Confederate) Private

NOTE:  Three entries here all for “H.E. Florey” in various Alabama CSA Units.  I would have the inclination to definitely say they are all three the same fellow, but the NPS database does not related them one to the other.  So, will leave them as three separate.  It would seem, however, that H.E. was in the conflict from the beginning to the end …. probably invalided out from his first unit and then moved more into support roles.  S.

1st Regiment, Alabama Reserves (62nd Regiment Infantry)   Overview:   1st Reserve Regiment [also called 62nd Regiment] was formed at Mobile, Alabama, during the summer of 1864 by adding two companies to Lockhart’s Alabama Battalion (Exempts). Most of the enlisted men were between the ages of sixteen and eighteen, and were recruited in the counties of Greene, Calhoun, Perry, Dallas, St. Clair, Randolph, Talladega, and Bibb. The regiment was assigned to General B.M. Thomas’ Brigade, and served at Mobile and the bay forts. Part of four companies were captured in October and a large part when Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely fell. It was included in the surrender of the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. The field officers were Colonel Daniel E. Huger, Lieutenant Colonel James L. Davidson, Major B.F. Yniestra.

  Florey, H.E.   Co. C, Camp of Instruction, Talladega, Alabama (Confederate) Private

NOTE:  Three entries here all for “H.E. Florey” in various Alabama CSA Units.  I would have the inclination to definitely say they are all three the same fellow, but the NPS database does not related them one to the other.  So, will leave them as three separate.  It would seem, however, that H.E. was in the conflict from the beginning to the end …. probably invalided out from his first unit and then moved more into support roles.  S.

Camp of Instruction, Talladega, Alabama   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

  Florey, Wiley   Co. D, 46th Regiment, Alabama Infantry (Confederate)  Private

46th Regiment, Alabama Infantry   Overview:   46th Infantry Regiment, organized at Loachapoka, Alabama, in May, 1862, contained men from Randolph, Pike, Blount, Coosa, Macon, Montgomery, and Henry counties. Sent to East Tennessee, it sustained several casualties in the fight at Tazewell. After serving in the Kentucky Campaign, the unit was assigned to General Tracey’s Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. A number of men were disabled at Port Gibson and about half were captured at Champion’s Hill, including all its field officers. The remaining men were captured at Vicksburg on July 4, 1863. Exchanged and reorganized, the 46th was attached to General Pettus’ Brigade and continued the fight with the Army of Tennessee. It was active at Chattanooga and Atlanta, moved with Hood to Tennessee, and saw action at Kinston and Bentonville. The regiment lost 15 killed and 45 wounded at Vicksburg and 1 killed and 14 wounded at Chattanooga. It totalled 367 men and 266 arms in December, 1863, had 174 present in January, 1865, and surrendered with no more than 75 in April. Colonel M.L. Woods, Lieutenant Colonel Osceola Kyle, and Majors George E. Brewer and J.M. Handley were in command.

Florin, Calvin   Co. K, 5th Regiment, Alabama Infantry  (Confederate)  Private

Alternate Name:  Floyd, Calvin

5th Regiment, Alabama Infantry    Overview:    5th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Montgomery, Alabama, in May, 1861, and proceeded to Virginia. Its companies were from the counties of Barbour, Clarke, Lowndes, Talladega, Dallas, Sumter, Monroe, Greene, and Pickens. At the Battle of First Manassas, the 5th was part of General Ewell’s Brigade, but was not actively engaged. During the balance of the war it served under Generals Rodes, O’Neal, and Battle. The unit was prominent in the campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia from Williamsburg to Cold Harbor, then fought with Early in the Shenandoah Valley and in the Appomattox operations. During April, 1862, it had a force of 660 men, but lost 27 killed and 128 wounded at Seven Pines and forty-one percent of the 225 at Malvern Hill. The regiment reported 24 killed, 133 wounded, and 121 missing at Chancellorsville, and of the 317 at Gettysburg, more than sixty percent were disabled. It surrendered with 4 officers and 53 men. The field officers were Colonels Josephus M. Hall, E. Lafayette Hobson, A. C. Jones, C.C. Pegues, and Robert E. Rodes; Lieutenant Colonel John T. Morgan; and Major Eugene Blackford.

Flury, A.   Co. I, 47th Regiment, Alabama Infantry  (Confederate) Private

Alternate Names in USG Records:   Flourey, Augustus  and   Florey, A.  and  Fleury, A.

47th Regiment, Alabama Infantry   Overview: 47th Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Loachapoka, Alabama, in May, 1862, and moved to Virginia in June. Most of its members were drawn from Chambers, Tallapoosa, Cherokee, and Coosa counties. During the war it was assigned to General Taliaferro’s, Law’s, and W.F. Perry’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 47th fought in many battles of the army from Cedar Mountain to Cold Harbor, except when it was Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. It participated in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and the final campaign at Appomattox. This regiment reported 88 casualties at Cedar Mountain, 32 at Second Manassas, 45 at Sharpsburg, and 40 at Gettysburg. It lost 111 at The Wilderness and during the Petersburg siege, June 13-December 31, there were 49 disabled. The unit surrendered 17 officers and 188 men. Its field officers were Colonels Michael J. Bulger, James W. Jackson, and James M. Oliver; Lieutenant Colonel Lee R. Terrell; and Majors James M. Campbell and John Y. Johnston.

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