F/F/Fs Who Served in Tennessee Units

Any F/F/Fs that were called out in the Newsletter have now been noted within the various individual state pages with links to the particular Newsletter pages in which they were mentioned.  Whenever possible I have also linked the official history of that individual’s Unit was well. 

   Note:  This symbol (the symbol for “transformation” I understand … which also looks a bit like the WWII USAF symbol) will be used to indicated anyone who died as a consequence of the war.

Interesting statistics …. if true:

On this page http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=califia1&id=I1660   the genealogist Bill Boggess gave the following information regarding the Civil War:

“There were 50 [fifty] Floras who volunteered in the of 1.05 million CSA [Confederate States Army] members and 117 [one hundred and seventeen] Floras of the 2.21 million USA [United States Army] members.”  I haven’t seen this mentioned before but I find it interesting (if true) as I have not run across any Floras in my lines who served as part of the armed forces of the Confederacy in the 1861-1865 conflict.

Anyone with information to add to any of the F/F/Fs noted, please contact me and I will add it to the individual’s paragraphs in the appropriate state.  (Email me at:    floras@netspeed.com.au   for passing along such things as photos, additional information, etc.)

++++++++++++++++++++

Fleury, G.N.   2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Confederate)  Private

2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry  Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

Flora, Daniel   Co. C, 63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry) (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, W.D.

63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry)   Overview:   63rd Infantry Regiment [also called 74th Regiment] was organized in July, 1862. The men were from the counties of Claiborne, Roane, Washington, Knox, Hawkins, and Sullivan. It served in General Gracie’s, B.R. Johnson’s, and McComb‘s Brigade. The unit fought at Chickamauga and in the Knoxville Campaign, then joined the Army of Northern Virginia during the spring of 1864. It went on to participate in the conflict at Drewry’s Bluff, the long Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox Campaign. It lost more than fifty percent of the 404 engaged at Chickamauga, had 19 disabled at Bean’s Station, and on April 8, 1864, totalled 405 men. At Drewry’s Bluff the regiment reported 311 effectives and on April 9, 1865, surrendered 4 officers and 57 men. The field officers were Colonels Richard G. Fain and Abraham Fulkerson, and Lieutenant Colonels John A. Aiken and William H. Fulkerson.

Flora, J.H.   Co. C, 63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry) (Confederate) Corporal

Alternate Name in USG Records:  Flora, James

63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry)   Overview:   63rd Infantry Regiment [also called 74th Regiment] was organized in July, 1862. The men were from the counties of Claiborne, Roane, Washington, Knox, Hawkins, and Sullivan. It served in General Gracie’s, B.R. Johnson’s, and McComb’s Brigade. The unit fought at Chickamauga and in the Knoxville Campaign, then joined the Army of Northern Virginia during the spring of 1864. It went on to participate in the conflict at Drewry’s Bluff, the long Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox Campaign. It lost more than fifty percent of the 404 engaged at Chickamauga, had 19 disabled at Bean’s Station, and on April 8, 1864, totalled 405 men. At Drewry’s Bluff the regiment reported 311 effectives and on April 9, 1865, surrendered 4 officers and 57 men. The field officers were Colonels Richard G. Fain and Abraham Fulkerson, and Lieutenant Colonels John A. Aiken and William H. Fulkerson.

Flora, Joseph   General and Staff Officers, Non-Regimental Enlisted Men (Confederate) Chaplain … Original Filed Under Flora, Joseph 63rd Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry)

General and Staff Officers, Non-Regimental Enlisted Men, CSA   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry)   Overview:   63rd Infantry Regiment [also called 74th Regiment] was organized in July, 1862. The men were from the counties of Claiborne, Roane, Washington, Knox, Hawkins, and Sullivan. It served in General Gracie’s, B.R. Johnson’s, and McComb’s Brigade. The unit fought at Chickamauga and in the Knoxville Campaign, then joined the Army of Northern Virginia during the spring of 1864. It went on to participate in the conflict at Drewry’s Bluff, the long Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox Campaign. It lost more than fifty percent of the 404 engaged at Chickamauga, had 19 disabled at Bean’s Station, and on April 8, 1864, totalled 405 men. At Drewry’s Bluff the regiment reported 311 effectives and on April 9, 1865, surrendered 4 officers and 57 men. The field officers were Colonels Richard G. Fain and Abraham Fulkerson, and Lieutenant Colonels John A. Aiken and William H. Fulkerson.

Flora, Joseph D.   Co. L, 8th Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry (Union) Private  also   10th Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry (Union) Private

8th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry   Overview:   Organized August, 1863, by consolidation of 5 Companies organized at Camp Nelson, Ky., June 30 to August 14, 1863, for 10th Tennessee Cavalry, and 7 Companies organized in Tennessee at large for 5th East Tennessee Cavalry. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, August to October, 1863. 4th Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to April, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to October, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 4th Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to November, 1864. District East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. 3rd Brigade, Cavalry Division, District of East Tennessee. to July, 1865. Cavalry Brigade, District of East Tennessee, to September, 1865.

Service:   Skirmish, Hawkins County, August 1, 1863. Burnside’s Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17, 1863. Occupation of Knoxville September 2. Greenville September 11. Kingsport September 18. Bristol September 19. Carter’s Depot September 20-21. Zollicoffer September 20-21. Watauga River Bridge September 21-22. Jonesboro September 21. Hall’s Ford, on Watauga River, September 22. Blountsville, Johnson’s Depot and Carter’s Depot September 22. Blue Springs October 10. Henderson’s Mill and Rheatown October 11. Zollicoffer October 12. Blountsville October 14. Bristol October 15. Knoxville Campaign November 4-December 23. Siege of Knoxville November 17-December 5. Duty at Knoxville, Greenville, Nashville and Columbia and patrol duty on line of Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad from Columbia to Nashville till August, 1864. At Bull’s Gap till October, 1864. Rheatown September 28. Watauga River September 29. Carter’s Station September 30-October 1. Operations in East Tennessee October 10-28. Greenville October 12. Bull’s Gap October 16. Clinch Mountain October 18. Clinch Valley, near Sneedsville, October 21. Mossy Creek and Panther Gap October 27. Morristown October 28. Russellville October 28. Operations against Breckenridge in East Tennessee November 4-17. Russellville November 11. Bull’s Gap November 11-13. Russellville November 14. Strawberry Plains November 16-17. Flat Creek November 17. Stoneman’s Saltsville (Va.) Raid December 10-29. Big Creek, near Rogersville, December 12. Kingsport December 13. Near Glade Springs December 15. Near Marion and capture of Wythevill December 16. Mt. Airey December 17. Near Marion December 17-18. Capture and destruction of Salt Works at Saltsville December 20-21. Stoneman’s Expedition from East Tennessee into Southwest Virginia and Western North Carolina March 21-April 25, 1865. Wytheville April 6. Shallow Ford and near Mocksville April 11. Salisbury April 12. Catawba River April 17. Swannanoa Gap April 22. Near Hendersonville April 28. Duty in District of East Tennessee till September, 1865. Mustered out September 11, 1865.
Regiment lost during service 1 Officer and 37 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 241 Enlisted men by disease. Total 280.Predecessor unit:TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS.
5th REGIMENT CAVALRY (5th EAST TENNESSEE).
Organized at Camp Nelson, Ky. (5 Cos), for 10th Tennessee Cavalry, June 30 to August 14, 1863. Attached to District of Central Kentucky, Dept. of the Ohio, to July, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of the Ohio, July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, July, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 23rd Army Corps, to August, 1863.
Service:Duty at Cynthiana, Ky., and along railroad till August, 1863. Pursuit of Morgan July 1-20. Buffington Island, Ohio, July 19. Operations against Scott July 25-August 6. Near Winchester, Ky., July 29. Irvine July 30. Lancaster, Stanford and Paint Lick Bridge July 31. Smith Shoals, Cumberland River, August 1. Assigned to 8th Tennessee Cavalry August, 1863 (which see).
[NOTE:  No Information Available at this time on the History of the 10th Regiment, Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry in which this individual also served.]

Flora, Theodore   Co. A, Third Consolidated Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Confederate) Private and also in Co. L, 35th Tennessee Infantry (5th Infantry) (1st Mountain Rifle Regiment) (Confederate) Private and Co. L, 36th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Names in USG Records:  Flora, Theodora    Ford, Theodore    Fora, Theodore

From the following page the information on the somewhat unusually named this extra information on Theodore is obtained.

http://www.confederatevets.com/confedQuery.cgi?last=Flora&state=TN

Name:  Flora, Theodora

Rank:  Private     Unit Information:  Company A, Third Regiment, Tennessee Consolidated Infantry Enlistment Information:  September 1861 at McMinnville, Tennessee for the duration of the war.

Captured at the surrender of General Johnson‘s Army in Greensboro, North Carolina on the 1st of May 1865 at which point he was paroled.

Reference
Muster rolls and lists of Confederates paroled in North Carolina from 1862 to 1865. National Archives Microfilm, M1781, Roll 6

3rd Consolidated Regiment, Tennessee Infantry   Overview:   “Units of the Confederate States Army” by Joseph H. Crute, Jr. contains no history for this unit.

36th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry   Overview:   36th Infantry Regiment was formed at Knoxville, Tennessee, during February, 1862. Men of this command were from Knoxville and Bradley, Hamilton, and Marion counties. It served in the Department of East Tennessee and took part in the Cumberland Gap operations. In June it disbanded; some of its members were then transferred to the 35th, 43rd, and 63rd Tennessee Infantry Regiments. The field officers were Colonel Robert J. Morgan, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Dunn, and Major William A. Camp.

35th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (5th Infantry) (1st Mountain Rifle Regiment)   Overview:  35th Infantry Regiment formerly the 5th Tennessee Regiment Provisional Army, [also called 1st Mountain Rifle Regiment] was organized during September, 1861, at Camp Smartt, near McMinnville, Tennessee. Its men were from the counties of Grundy, Warren, Van Buren, Cannon, Sequatchie, DeKalb, Hamilton, and Bledsoe. It fought at Shiloh, Shelton’s Hill, Richmond, Perryville, then moved to Knoxville, Shelbyville, and later Murfreesboro. During the war it was assigned to General L.E. Polk’s, Granbury’s, and Palmer’s Brigade, Army of Tennessee, and from September, 1863, to April, 1864, consolidated with Nixon’s 48th Regiment. The 35th participated in many battles from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, returned to Tennesee with Hood, and saw action in North Carolina. It had 369 engaged at Shiloh, lost nine percent of the 295 in the Richmond fight, and sustained 25 casualties at Murfreesboro. Twenty-nine percent of the 215 at Chickamauga were disabled and in December, 1863, the 35th/48th totalled 251 men and 207 arms. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered. The field officers were Colonel Benjamin J. Hill; Lieutenant Colonels R.B. Roberts, Joseph A. Smith, and John L. Spurlock; and Majors Joseph Brown, William W.J. Broawnlow, and G.S. Deakins.

Flora, William   Co. F, 1st Regiment, Tennesee Volunteer Cavalry  (Union)  Entered as Private, Left as Blacksmith

1st Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry   Overview:   Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, November, 1862, from 4th Tennessee Infantry. Attached to Camp Dennison, Ohio, to December, 1862. Reserve Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade. 1st Cavalry Division, Army of the Cumberland, to November, 1864. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division Mississippi, to January, 1865. District Middle Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to June, 1865.

Service:   Duty at Camp Dennison, Ohio, till December 24, 1862. Moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, thence to Louisville, Ky.; to Shepherdsville, Ky., and return to Louisville, Ky., thence moved to Nashville, Tenn., January 9-17, 1863. Reconnoissance to Franklin and Brentwood and occupation of Franklin February 2,1863. Moved to Concord Church February 2, and duty there till February 28. Expedition from Lexington to Clifton February 17-20 (Detachment). Moved to Triune February 28, and duty there till June. Petersburg March 2. Action at Harpeth River, near Triune, March 8. Franklin April 10. Near Chapel Hill April 13(Detachment). Rigg’s Cross Roads April 16. College Grove April 26 (Detachment). Expedition to Thompson’s Station May 2. Rover May 5. Jordan’s Store May 30. Franklin June 4. Triune June 9. Middle Tennessee or Tullahoma Campaign June 23-July 7. Eaglesville, Uniontown and Rover June 23. Middletown June 24. Fosterville, Guy’s Gap and Shelbyville June 27. Bethpage Bridge, Elk River, July 1-2. Occupation of Middle Tennessee till August 16. At Dechard Station till July 12, then at Huntsville, Ala. Crossing Cumberland Mountains and passage of the Tennessee River, Chickamauga (Ga.) Campaign, August 16-September 22. Lebanon and Rawlinsville, Ala., September 5. Alpine September 9. Reconnoissance toward Rome September 10-11. Dirt Town September 12. Lafayette September 12. Battle of Chickamauga September 19-21. Operations against Wheeler and Roddy September 30-October l7. Anderson’s Cross Roads October 2. McMinnville October 2. Shelbyville and Farmington October 4. Bucktown Tavern, Ala., October 12. Sulphur Springs, Tenn., October 21. At Winchester till November 18. Scout to Estill Springs and Tullahoma October 25-27. Moved to Alexandria November 18, and to Sparta November 20. Actions at Sparta November 20, 24, 26 and 27 Yankeetown November 30 (Detachment). March to Knoxville December 7-15, and to Strawberry Plains December 15-16. East Tennessee Campaign December, 1863, to February, 1864. Operations about Dandridge and Mossy Creek December 24-28, 1863. Hay’s Ferry, near Dandridge, December 24. Mossy Creek December 25. Talbot Station December 27. Talbot Station, Mossy Creek, December 29. Expedition to Cosby Creek, N. C., January, 1864. Cosby Creek January 17. Near Wilsonville January 22. Operations about Dandridge January 26-28. Fair Garden January 26-27. McNutt’s Bridge January 27. Scout from Marysville toward Seviersville February 1-2. Moved to Cleveland, Tenn., February 10-March 11. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May to September. Catoosa Springs May 4. Varnell’s Station May 7-8. Demonstration on Dalton May 9-13. Tilton May 13. Resaca May 14-15. Pursuit to Cassville May 16-19. Near Cassville May 19. Stilesborough May 23. Huntsville or Burnt Hickory May 24. About Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 25-June 5. Burned Church May 30 and June 11. Ackworth June 3-4. Big Shanty June 6. Operations about Marietta and against Kenesaw Mountain June 10-July 2. Pine Hill June 11-14. McAffee’s Cross Roads June 11-12. Powder Springs and Noonday Creek June 20. Allatoona July 1. Nickajack Creek July 2-6. Kingston July 3. Ruff’s Station July 4. Chattahoochie River July 6-17. Cochran’s Ford July 9. Siege of Atlanta July 22-August 25. Mason’s Church July 23. McCook’s Raid on Atlanta & West Point Railroad July 27-31. Campbellton July 28. Lovejoy Station July 29. Clear Creek and Newnan July 31. Ordered to Nashville, Tenn. Rousseau’s pursuit of Wheeler September 1-8. Lavergne September 1. Franklin September 2. Union City September 2 (Detachment). Campbellsville September 5. Pursuit of Forest September 25-October 10. Pulaski September 26-27. Franklin September 27. Cypress Creek, Ala., October 6. Florence, Ala., October 6-7. Mussel Shoals, near Florence, October 30. Near Shoal Creek October 31. Near Florence November 5-6 and 9. Nashville Campaign November and December. On line of Shoal Creek November 16-20. Lawrenceburg November 21. Fouche Springs November 23. Campbellsville November 24. Columbia November 24-27. Battle of Franklin November 30. Battle of Nashville, December 15-16. Pursuit of Hood to the Tennessee River December 17-28. Lynnville December 24. Richland Creek December 24-25. Pulaski December 25-26. Expedition into Mississippi January 15-21, 1865. Moved from Eastport, Miss., to Nashville, Tenn., February 10-17, and duty there till June. Mustered out June, 1865.Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 56 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 293 Enlisted men by disease. Total 356.

  Flora, W.D.   Co. C, 63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry) (Confederate) Private

63rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Fain’s) (74th Infantry)   Overview:   63rd Infantry Regiment [also called 74th Regiment] was organized in July, 1862. The men were from the counties of Claiborne, Roane, Washington, Knox, Hawkins, and Sullivan. It served in General Gracie’s, B.R. Johnson’s, and McComb’s Brigade. The unit fought at Chickamauga and in the Knoxville Campaign, then joined the Army of Northern Virginia during the spring of 1864. It went on to participate in the conflict at Drewry’s Bluff, the long Petersburg siege north of the James River, and the Appomattox Campaign. It lost more than fifty percent of the 404 engaged at Chickamauga, had 19 disabled at Bean’s Station, and on April 8, 1864, totalled 405 men. At Drewry’s Bluff the regiment reported 311 effectives and on April 9, 1865, surrendered 4 officers and 57 men. The field officers were Colonels Richard G. Fain and Abraham Fulkerson, and Lieutenant Colonels John A. Aiken and William H. Fulkerson.

Flora, William   Co. 3F, 35th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (5th Infantry) (1st Mountain Rifle Regiment) (Confederate) Private

35th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (5th Infantry) (1st Mountain Rifle Regiment)   Overview:   35th Infantry Regiment formerly the 5th Tennessee Regiment Provisional Army, [also called 1st Mountain Rifle Regiment] was organized during September, 1861, at Camp Smartt, near McMinnville, Tennessee. Its men were from the counties of Grundy, Warren, Van Buren, Cannon, Sequatchie, DeKalb, Hamilton, and Bledsoe. It fought at Shiloh, Shelton’s Hill, Richmond, Perryville, then moved to Knoxville, Shelbyville, and later Murfreesboro. During the war it was assigned to General L.E. Polk’s, Granbury’s, and Palmer’s Brigade, Army of Tennessee, and from September, 1863, to April, 1864, consolidated with Nixon’s 48th Regiment. The 35th participated in many battles from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, returned to Tennesee with Hood, and saw action in North Carolina. It had 369 engaged at Shiloh, lost nine percent of the 295 in the Richmond fight, and sustained 25 casualties at Murfreesboro. Twenty-nine percent of the 215 at Chickamauga were disabled and in December, 1863, the 35th/48th totalled 251 men and 207 arms. On April 26, 1865, it surrendered. The field officers were Colonel Benjamin J. Hill; Lieutenant Colonels R.B. Roberts, Joseph A. Smith, and John L. Spurlock; and Majors Joseph Brown, William W.J. Broawnlow, and G.S. Deakins.

  Flory, Noah   Co. K, 60th Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry (Crawford’s) (79th Infantry)  (Confederate) Private

Alternate Names in USG Records:  Flora, Mark   and   Flora, N.A.  and   Flora, Noah’s Ark

60th Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry (Crawford’s) (79th Infantry)   Overview:   60th Regiment Infantry [also called 79th Regiment] was organized at Haynesville, Tennessee, in October, 1862. Men of this unit were recruited in the counties of Washington, Hawkins, Sullivan, Grainger, and Cocke. It was assigned to General J.C. Vaughn’s Brigade and remained there throughout the war. Serving in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, most of the regiment was captured in the conflict at Big Black River Bridge and the remaining men at Vicksburg. Exchanged and reorganized as mounted infantry, it skirmished in Western Virginia and East Tennessee, then disbanded during the spring of 1865. Its commanders were Colonels John H. Crawford and Nathan Gregg, and Lieutenant Colonel James A. Rhea.

H O M E