F/F/Fs Who Served in Georgia Units

Any F/F/Fs that were called out in the Newsletter have now been noted within the various individual state pages with links to the particular Newsletter pages in which they were mentioned.  Whenever possible I have also linked the official history of that individual’s Unit was well. 

   Note:  This symbol (the symbol for “transformation” I understand … which also looks a bit like the WWII USAF symbol) will be used to indicated anyone who died as a consequence of the war.

Interesting statistics …. if true:

On this page http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=califia1&id=I1660   the genealogist Bill Boggess gave the following information regarding the Civil War:

“There were 50 [fifty] Floras who volunteered in the of 1.05 million CSA [Confederate States Army] members and 117 [one hundred and seventeen] Floras of the 2.21 million USA [United States Army] members.”  I haven’t seen this mentioned before but I find it interesting (if true) as I have not run across any Floras in my lines who served as part of the armed forces of the Confederacy in the 1861-1865 conflict.

Anyone with information to add to any of the F/F/Fs noted, please contact me and I will add it to the individual’s paragraphs in the appropriate state.  (Email me at:    floras@netspeed.com.au   for passing along such things as photos, additional information, etc.)

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  Fleury, F.P.   Co. A, 39th Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Confederate) Corporal

39th Regiment, Georgia Infantry  Overview:   39th Infantry Regiment, organized at Dalton, Georgia, in April, 1862, recruited its members in the counties of Butts, Whitfield, Bartow, Dade, Fayette, Clayton, and Chattahoochee. The unit was ordered to Tennessee, then Mississippi where it was brigaded under T.H. Taylor in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. After fighting at Champion’s Hill, it was captured on July 4, 1863, at Vicksburg. Exchanged and assigned to General Cummings’ Brigade, the 39th went on to participate in the campaigns of the Army of Tennessee from Chattanooga to Nashville and in 1865 saw action at Bentonville. It reported 52 casualties at Chattanooga and in December, 1863, totalled 243 men and 202 arms. During Janaury, 1865, the regiment had 177 fit for duty and surrendered in April. Its commanders were Colonel J.T. McConnell, Lieutenant Colonels J.F.B. Jackson and William P. Milton, and Majors Tilmon H. Pitner and Gabriel H. Randell.

Flury, C.H.   Co. K, 15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:   Fleury, C.H.

15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry   Overview:   15th Infantry Regiment, organized in the spring of 1861 at Athens, Georgia, contained men from Hancock, Stephens, Elbert, Lamar, Warren, Wilkes, Taliaferro, and Oglethorpe counties. On July 22, 1861, the unit was reported to be en route to Virginia and upon its arrival was assigned to the Potomac District. Later it was placed in General Toombs’ and Benning’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 15th was involved in the campaigns of the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was detached with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. It continued the fight in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and later around Appomattox. The regiment totalled 441 men in April, 1862, and lost 108 during Seven Days’ Battles. It sustained 54 casualties at Second Manassas, 36 during the Maryland Campaign, and forty percent of the 368 engaged at Gettysburg. From April 14, to May 6, there were 73 disabled, and from August 1 to December 31, 1864, it lost 50 killed and wounded. At the surrender, 20 officers and 226 men were present. The field officers were Colonels Dudley M. DuBose, William M. McIntosh, William T. Millican, and Thomas W. Thomas; Lieutenant Colonels Stephen Z. Hearnsberger, Peter J. Shannon, T.J. Smith, and Linton Stephens; and Major Joseph T. Smith.

  Flury, J.J.   Co. K, 15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Confederate) Entered as Private, left as Corporal

Alternate Names in USG Records:  Flury, Joseph   and   Fleury, Joseph

15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry   Overview:   15th Infantry Regiment, organized in the spring of 1861 at Athens, Georgia, contained men from Hancock, Stephens, Elbert, Lamar, Warren, Wilkes, Taliaferro, and Oglethorpe counties. On July 22, 1861, the unit was reported to be en route to Virginia and upon its arrival was assigned to the Potomac District. Later it was placed in General Toombs’ and Benning’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 15th was involved in the campaigns of the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was detached with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. It continued the fight in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and later around Appomattox. The regiment totalled 441 men in April, 1862, and lost 108 during Seven Days’ Battles. It sustained 54 casualties at Second Manassas, 36 during the Maryland Campaign, and forty percent of the 368 engaged at Gettysburg. From April 14, to May 6, there were 73 disabled, and from August 1 to December 31, 1864, it lost 50 killed and wounded. At the surrender, 20 officers and 226 men were present. The field officers were Colonels Dudley M. DuBose, William M. McIntosh, William T. Millican, and Thomas W. Thomas; Lieutenant Colonels Stephen Z. Hearnsberger, Peter J. Shannon, T.J. Smith, and Linton Stephens; and Major Joseph T. Smith.

  Flury, William A.   Co. K, 15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry (Confederate) Private

Alternate Name in USG Records:   Fleury, W.A.

15th Regiment, Georgia Infantry   Overview:   15th Infantry Regiment, organized in the spring of 1861 at Athens, Georgia, contained men from Hancock, Stephens, Elbert, Lamar, Warren, Wilkes, Taliaferro, and Oglethorpe counties. On July 22, 1861, the unit was reported to be en route to Virginia and upon its arrival was assigned to the Potomac District. Later it was placed in General Toombs’ and Benning’s Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia. The 15th was involved in the campaigns of the army from the Seven Days’ Battles to Cold Harbor, except when it was detached with Longstreet at Suffolk, Chickamauga, and Knoxville. It continued the fight in the Petersburg siege north of the James River and later around Appomattox. The regiment totalled 441 men in April, 1862, and lost 108 during Seven Days’ Battles. It sustained 54 casualties at Second Manassas, 36 during the Maryland Campaign, and forty percent of the 368 engaged at Gettysburg. From April 14, to May 6, there were 73 disabled, and from August 1 to December 31, 1864, it lost 50 killed and wounded. At the surrender, 20 officers and 226 men were present. The field officers were Colonels Dudley M. DuBose, William M. McIntosh, William T. Millican, and Thomas W. Thomas; Lieutenant Colonels Stephen Z. Hearnsberger, Peter J. Shannon, T.J. Smith, and Linton Stephens; and Major Joseph T. Smith.

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